Michigan and Ohio Receive Grants to Improve Water and Algal Blooms in Great Lakes

Michigan and Ohio Receive Grants to Improve Water and Algal Blooms in Great Lakes

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Michigan and Ohio Receive Grants to Improve Water and Algal Blooms in Great Lakes

On September 27, 2012, the US Environmental Protection Agency stated that 11 Great Lakes Restoration Projects will receive grants to improve water quality and reduce certain nutrients that directly contribute to harmful blooms of algae in the lakes and surrounding watersheds. 

The grants are listed below:

1. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will receive $780,745 for the Lucas County Stormwater Demonstration Project.  The project seeks improve stormwater management and install “green infrastructure” at nine different locations. 

2. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will receive $350,000 for nutrient reduction in the Lake Erie basin and river basin.  The project aims to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus runoff from agricultural by 30 to 50 percent. 

3. The Nature Conservancy will receive $414,765 for nutrient reduction in the south Findlay area and the Upper Blanchard watershed. 

4. The University of Toledo will receive $472,491 for reduction of nutrients, sediments, and bacteria in the Maumee Bay State Park. 

5. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will receive $527,152 for the Powell Creak Nutrient Reduction Project.  Project will replace bad septic systems, plant over 3,600 acres of crops, install 20 acres of wetlands, and more. 

6. Ohio State University will receive $193,923 for a nutrient management plan in the Blanchard watershed. 

7.  The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development will receive $265,980 to reduce the amount of sediment and nutrients that enter the Western Lake Erie Basin. 

8. The Grand Traverse Bay Watershed Initiative will receive $499,741 to reduce the amount of stormwater that flows into the Kids Creek. 

9. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will receive $995,204 to reduce phosphorus and E. Coli in the Kawkawlin River. 

10. The Muskegon River Watershed Assembly will receive $798,282 for restoration projects in the Riparian areas of the Muskegon River Watershed. 

11. Michigan State University will receive $189,376 for reducing phosphorus from farming runoff. 

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

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