$6.5M Awarded for Restoring San Francisco Water/Habitats

$6.5M Awarded for Restoring San Francisco Water/Habitats

Share
$6.5M Awarded for Restoring San Francisco Water/Habitats


On October 17, 2012, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded $6.5 million to 10 different state and local agencies and non-profit organizations.  The funds will be used to restore water quality in the San Francisco Bay watershed and surrounding wetlands.  


Jared Blumenfeld, the EPA Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest, stated: “San Francisco Bay is a magnificent treasure that supports more than 500 species of wildlife, including 128 threatened or endangered species, and the economies of Bay shoreline communities.  It is critical to safeguard this productive natural resource, and these projects with our state and local partners will make great strides to achieve that goal.”


The agencies and awards are listed below:


The San Francisco Estuary Partnership and the Association of Bay Area Governments receives $1.55 million to redesign flood control channels to help protect wetlands.


The Napa County Flood Control District receives $1.5 million for stream restoration at the Rutherford Reach and reduce sediment into the Napa River.  


The Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy receives $1 million to fix 1,050 feet of creek channel and restore wetlands and natural habitats.  


The Sonoma Land Trust receives $941,000 for restoration of 960 acres of tidal Marsh throughout the San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge.  


The California State Coastal Conservancy receives $500,000 to form programs for reducing food containers in the bay area.  


The San Francisco Estuary Partnership and the Association of Bay Area Governments receives $250,000 to address citizens through social media and promote the reduction of pesticide use.  


Audubon California receives $235,000 to improve 300 acres of tidal marsh of the Sonoma Creek.  


The Alameda County Resource Conservation District receives $181,000 to form stream buffers, repair stream channels, and improve rural roads along the Alameda Creek watershed.  


The San Mateo Resource Conservation District receives $75,000 to improve creek channels and open 40 miles of upstream habitat to let steelhead breed in the San Francisquito Creek.  


Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 

Comments

comments

Share

Related Articles


Read previous post:
Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act (Full Text )

Close